Accountability revolution: church, children, and charity

A starting place for the discussion on how to rebuild our society

8

The wild ride is about to begin. I am not a soothsayer, but it is obvious that the election fraud, jab genocide, media lies, paedophilia, blackmail, human trafficking, usury… are all coming to a head. In order to round up some very dangerous enemies you need the public off the streets and all venues closed. Expect a spectacular cover story to achieve these enormous ends. Lockdown season may well come back, but it is temporary. Central bank digital currencies can also be used to exclude crooks — and make bribe money and offshore stashes worthless. Everything has to fall apart for the normies to pay any attention; they aren’t interested in truth, only comfort and conformity.

My thoughts are increasingly directed towards the reconstruction process. Magical healing technology, free (at point of use) energy, and amazing on- and off-planet transport are treats we can dream of… and possibly even anticipate. None of them solves the basic problems: our degraded consciousness, our defiled children, and our numerous destitute. The old, sick, orphaned, traumatised, and war wounded have to be cared for, and the bloated welfare state (as we knew it) is about to go away. An unrestricted war that assaults every possible attack surface means we will be fighting for decades, even after the enemy threat is obliterated.

The foe’s core aim is to avoid accountability, being above the law… “do what thou wilt (without consequences)”. This counter-revolution is one of accountability at every possible level. Church is how we ensure personal accountability for righteous behaviour, and it is done in small groups, not in vast buildings. We are accountable for how our children are raised, and must reclaim them from professional babysitters and state indoctrination. Charity is how we care for the weak, but it must have accountability for change and outcomes as its focus, else we are just enablers for endless dysfunction and victimhood.

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A misty evening in Darlington