The sacred nature of children (and parenting)

Children are born divine, but our commercialised society attempts to commodify them

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On my long winding journey of discovery I have evolved my focus: voice communications, packet network performance, privacy and power, media and tech corruption, systemic criminality, creeping tyranny, information warfare, and now onto spiritual matters. Over time it gets closer and closer to the base issues, which are ones of the nature of life itself and how it is sustained when confronted with evil. If something doesn’t help us to nurture the next generation, or fails to deliver a better world to those who come after us, then why are we doing it? Eventually any inquiry into the profound will lead us towards how society relates to children.

My former tech career was unconsciously enmeshed in the transhumanist ideology. Artificial intelligence, nanotech, and pervasive sensors were seen as essentially good — but with potential (but limited) drawbacks. I failed to understand where this was all going: a small class of (absolutely wicked) people who position themselves as godlike, genetically and socially engineering the rest of us. We serfs would end up absolutely dependent on their systems for our survival, and detached from nature. Such technofascist enslavement has gone from an abstract concern to daily reality in the last few years. This has caused me to go on a new quest for moral and spiritual fundamentals.

In this video I muse on my experience as a parent in these times, and note how dysfunctional we have become in how we relate to children. The one point I wish to drive home is that children have unalienable rights as much as any other human, and their relationship to their parents is a sacred one. They are not commodities to be passed around or owned — not by the state, nor by other adults, whether in official garb or as our social contacts. Those who interfere in the divine nature of children, and their sacred parental bond, deserve the most severe condemnation and punishment. This includes the spiritual abuse of children, which is an under-appreciated and invisible phenomenon with lasting negative effects.

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The ordinary is quite wonderful — but you have to pay attention to the wonder.