When in a war it helps if you fight

In a war of infiltration the institutions around us are subverted into gangsterism

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Part of me wishes I could be curating my old essays into books to publish, sourcing some replacement headphones for the ones I broke earlier in the week, making a calendar for 2023 so people stop nagging me, researching up on spiritual topics that interest me, improving my skills and making candles (my new manual labour hobby!), and earning a few extra pounds to treat myself to some camera gear for Christmas. Life just doesn’t seem to want me to put my energy in those directions. Instead I am waging a war of attrition against corrupt parts of the British state (which is nearly all of it).

I am no longer in “go along to get along” mode with gangsters, and never will be ever again. Yes, some compromises are necessary as we have to pick our battles. So if it is 11pm and I need to go shopping, the only option is my local Tesco, nasty as they may be. That said, my life is dedicated “all in” to combatting tyranny. I am playing my tiny role in establishing a new society based on sound and longstanding moral principles. Part of the process is having to engage with the dying parts of the old system (before they collapse) to gain experience in the nature of the problem, so that I am wiser in how I go about helping to reimagine how the world works.

I have made a video about my experience with Durham County Council since it is a simple matter of due process. Whatever you think about the size and role of the state, or the nature of financing of local government, when the council claims there is a court order against me then I should be able to ask to see it. When they refuse to even acknowledge the request for due process, anonymously threaten me, evade accountability, and ignore complaints — then you know they are scared of being exposed as crooks. I don’t get to work on things that may service just myself, but I am enjoying doing my bit for a world where criminals are kicked out of positions of authority.

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Sign of the times found at Saltburn pier.